Public Meeting Tuesday 28th May 2019

milky-way

The Milky Way Galaxy

Photo Source: skysurvey.org

 

Annual General Meeting (AGM) this month

AGM

Our AGM is scheduled for next Tuesday 28th May.

 

Committeemeeting

Nominations are invited from financial members to serve on the Committee. The Committee meets on the evening of the first Wednesday of each month, except January.

 

Treasurertreasurer

The Treasurer position will become vacant at the AGM. The role is not onerous. Members who wish to pursue this important role in our organisation please enquire here –

<tas.secretary@gmail.com>

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The Annual General Meeting will be followed by telescope viewing concurrently with an on-screen program–

Telescope Viewing –

Jupiter will be visible. No moon. We may be able to view a few star clusters and nebulae on our 14-inch telescope.

On-Screen Viewing –

The Milky Way Galaxy

milky-way

The Milky Way Galaxy is our home galaxy in the universe. It is a fairly typical barred spiral with four major arms in its disk, at least one spur, and a newly discovered outer arm. The galactic centre, which is located about 26,000 light-years from Earth, contains at least one supermassive black hole (called Sagittarius A*), and is crossed by a bar. The Milky Way began forming around 12 billion years ago and is part of a group of about 50 galaxies called the Local Group. The Andromeda Galaxy is part of this group as are numerous smaller galaxies, including the Magellanic Clouds. The Local Group itself is part of a larger gathering of galaxies called the Virgo Supercluster of galaxies.

 

Milky Way Galaxy Profile

Type            Barred Spiral

Diameter  100,000 – 180,000 light-years

Distance to Galactic Centre   27,000 light-years

Age              13.6 billion Earth years

Number of stars          100 – 400 billion

Constellation                Sagittarius

Group                              Local Group

 

Facts About The Milky Way

  • The Milky Way began as a series of dense regions in the early universe not long after the Big Bang. The first stars to form were in globular clusters that still exist. They are among the oldest stars formed in the Milky Way region.
  • The Milky Way has grown by merging with other galaxies through time. It is currently acquiring stars from a very small galaxy called the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal, as well as gobbling up material from the Magellanic Clouds.
  • The Milky Way moves through space at a velocity of about 552 kilometres per second (343 miles per second) with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation.
  • The Milky Way’s central core contains a supermassive black hole. It is commonly referred to as Sagittarius A*. It contains the mass of about 4.3 million Suns.
  • The stars, gas and dust of the Milky Way all orbit the centre at a rate of about 220 kilometres per second. This constant rate for all stars at different distances from the core implies the existence of a shell of dark matter surrounding our galaxy.
  • Our galaxy will collide with Andromeda Galaxy in about 5 billion years. Some astronomers refer to these two galaxies as a binary system of giant spirals.

Source: https://space-facts.com/milky-way/

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Our Society’s financial year starts on 1st April each year.

Accordingly members’ subscriptions are due for payment.

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Annual membership –

$30 each adult

or $40 each family

$10 students.

Payment on-line or

cash at meetings.

No EFTPOS facility available.

 

On-line payment is easy to

TAURANGA ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY

Bank account number

03 0435 0659752 00

Please indicate

“Subscription” and your name.

Once payment is received your nametags will be available at subsequent meetings.

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Our next public meeting –

Annual General Meeting

and Viewing – both astronomical and on-screen.

Tuesday 28th May at 7.30pm

Fergusson Park Observatory, Tilby Drive, Matua, Tauranga.

 

Admission to our meetings –

A donation of $5 is requested.

Members & children free.

Payment by cash only.

No EFTPOS facility available.

 

Annual membership –

$30 each adult

or $40 each family

$10 students.

Payment on-line or

cash at meetings.

No EFTPOS facility available.

*****************************

telescope

Telescope viewing possible only with minimum or zero cloud cover.

TAS large

www.facebook.com

tas.secretary@gmail.com

 

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